Install Theme

ryanpanos:

Theater Series | Hiroshi Sugimoto | Socks Studio

Starting in the late 1970s, Hiroshi Sugimoto took pictures of cinemas interiors and drive-ins with the aim of encapsulate the whole lenght of a movie in a single shot. He left the camera shutters open throughout the running of a movie and the glowing screen of the cinemas was left as a trace on each take. A somehow uncanny light resonates in the dark cinema halls. At a further glance, this central light ethereally underlines the rich architectural details of the theater interiors. You might want to confront Sugimoto’s work with Michael Wesely’s, a photographer that uses to take photographs featuringi  3 years long exposures: read “The passing of time“, (on Socks).

(via jaectherake)

vsw:

Spectropia, or Surprising Spectral Illusions: Showing Ghosts Everywhere, and of Any Color published by James G. Gregory, 1864

from the Visual Studies Workshop Books and Periodicals Archive

vsw.org

(via todf)

Lucky Cat Tea Pet

Lucky Cat Tea Pet

Lucky Meistreya Buddha Yixing Tea Pet

Lucky Meistreya Buddha Yixing Tea Pet

(Source: teavivre.com)

tea pet dragon

tea pet dragon

vintagegal:

David Bowie photographed by Masayoshi Sukita, 1973

vintagegal:

David Bowie photographed by Masayoshi Sukita, 1973

(via sarampiona)

Made by @akaFLAMEGiRL

Made by @akaFLAMEGiRL

(Source: twitter.com)

"Procedural Brutalism," a gif of procedurally generated architecture by a game developer named Cedric, built using Unity (via BLDGBLOG)

"Procedural Brutalism," a gif of procedurally generated architecture by a game developer named Cedric, built using Unity (via BLDGBLOG)

asylum-art:

Emily Blincoe: Color-coded photography

We’ve already featured talented Austin-based photographer Emily Blincoe a couple of times on iGNANT. Her output is amazingly creative and never fails to make us smile. Emily is probably best known for her color-coded arrangements.

For her latest works she collected color permutation of tomatoes, oranges, eggs, ice cream and leaves and sorted them into groups and gradients for each image

(via lonecomic)